Ever stuck in tough decision? This technique called WADM will help you.

Ever wrestle with a tough decision? One day you favor option A and the next day you jump back to option B. Wouldn’t it be great if making a tough decision were a simple as picking the higher number?

This strategy developed by M.J. Demacro, an author of best selling book Millionaire fastlane will help you right away. First off, WADM stands for THE WEIGHTED AVERAGE DECISION MATRIX. This decision tool quantifies for big decisions. You know them: Should you move or stay? Quit or continue? Go back to college or not? For WADM, you need paper and a pencil. Keep in mind, WADM is for big decisions, so you can use this to make biggest dicisions of your life.

With WADM, decision-making is easy as it isolates and prioritizes factors relevant to your decisions and then quantifies each decision with a value. The higher value reflects the better decision. For example, if you had a choice between moving to Detroit or Phoenix, WADM would yield a simple numerical valuation like Detroit 88 and Phoenix 93. Based on the number, Phoenix is the better choice. While WADM is subjective and requires your unfettered objectivity, it is a great tool for identifying which choice is more favorable to your preferences.

To use WADM, a minimum of two choices is needed, but it could be used for more. Let’s say you do indeed live in Detroit and are considering moving to Phoenix. You struggle with the decision and can’t get clarity. One day you want to move, the next you want to stay. Usually, this waffling occurs when there are too many decision factors within each choice.

Get a pencil and paper. Make three columns on your paper, one headed “Factors” and the other two for each choice, “Detroit” and “Phoenix.” Second, what decision factors are important in your decision? Weather? Schools? Cost of living? Being near family? Write down all factors relevant to the decision, no matter how small. Write these factors in the “Factor” column. Your WADM would now look like this:

FactorsDetroitPhoenix
Weather
School
Cost of living
Business climate
Taxes
Safety
Entertainment
Near family

Thirdly, next to each decision factor, weigh its importance to the decision from 1 through 10, with 10 being the most important. For example, you are seasonally depressed, so weather is assigned a 10 in your matrix. Subsequently, your children are almost 18 so you decide that a good school system isn’t a top priority and it receives a 3. Do this for all factors. Now your WADM looks like this:

FactorsDetroitPhoenix
Weather (10)
School (3)
Cost of living (6)
Business climate (2)
Taxes (7)
Safety (4)
Entertainment (8)
Near family (7)

After each criterion is ranked 1 through 10, grade each choice 1 through 10 for each decision factor. The school system in Detroit? You give it a 4. In Phoenix, you give the school system a 5, as you determine it is slightly better. You assign entertainment in Detroit an 8 as they are home to your mighty Red Wings, while Phoenix gets a 6. Continue for each decision factor within each choice. Your WADM should now look something like this.

FactorsDetroitPhoenix
Weather (10)28
School (3)23
Cost of living (6)57
Business climate (2)64
Taxes (7)67
Safety (4)36
Entertainment (8)52
Near family (7)100

Next, for each row, multiply the weight times the grade and put that number next to the grade in parentheses. For example, in the entertainment row. Detroit receives a 40 (8 weight x 5 should now look like this: grade), while Phoenix receives a 16 (8 weight X2 grade). Do this for all rows. Your WADM should now look like this:

FactorsDetroitPhoenix
Weather (10)2 [20]8 [80]
School (3)2 [6]3 [9]
Cost of living (6)5 [30]7 [42]
Business climate (2)6 [12]4 [8]
Taxes (7)6 [42]7 [49]
Safety (4)3 [12]6 [24]
Entertainment (8)5 [40]2 [16]
Near family (7)10 [70]0 [0]

The final step is simply to add up the graded weight columns to get a final number for each choice. The highest number will be the choice you favor. Your final WADM would look like this:

FactorsDetroitPhoenix
Weather (10)2 [20]8 [80]
School (3)2 [6]3 [9]
Cost of living (6)5 [30]7 [42]
Business climate (2)6 [12]4 [8]
Taxes (7)6 [42]7 [49]
Safety (4)3 [12]6 [24]
Entertainment (8)5 [40]2 [16]
Near family (7)10 [70]0 [0]
Total232228

In this hypothetical example, you should stay in Detroit because it received the highest score, 232 over 228.

The WADM is a great tool for making dicisions as long as you are perfectly honest with the factor weighting.

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